Previous Next
Record 20/83

Image 1 of 2

A yellow paper printer's copy of the illustrations from the book Plum Duff and Cake, the journal of James Nichols 1874-5: An account of his voyage to Picton, New Zealand on the ship Carnatic and some of his new experiences in the Colony, edited by Joyce Neill, 1975, printed at the Pegasus Press, Christchurch, New Zealand. Joyce Neill [1906-2000] has signed the paper. Illustrations: A clipper ship of the 1870s (National Maritime Museum). A typical page from the Journal of James Nichols. Part of the index to the passenger list. James Nichols and his bride, formerly Ellen Hart (George Eden). "The Scale of Dietary". One of James's shipboard lists. The Immigration Barracks at Blenheim. The Tuamarina Wesleyan chapel. The residence of Captain and Mrs. Baillie (Alexander Turnbull Library). Near Halfway House on the Blenheim-Picton road (Alexander Turnbull Library). The river wharf at Blenheim, c.1900 (S.C. Smith collection, Turnbull Library). Blenheim streets in flood, c.1900 (Hinge Collection, Turnbull Library). Part of the Feilding Settlement in 1876 (Harding Denton Collection, Turnbull Library). James Nichols, William Jordan and Charles White (A. McCusker). At the carnatic reunion in 1925. At the 1935 reunion (A. McCusker). "Mr. J.W. Nichols and Daughter". A scan of two of these illustrations is to be used in the Changing European History Gallery 2 display in commemoration of the Marlborough Provincial 150th anniversary on 1 November 2009. They are The immigration Barracks and the 1935 Carnatic reunion (the 1935 one was not used). ........................................................................................................................... Caption 21 The Immigration Barracks at Blenheim. This hostel was built for only one shipload of immigrants, the 1875 immigrants, off the clipper Carnatic, which arrived in Picton. The Barracks stood on the bank of the Omaka (Taylor) River in Park Terrace, a site later occupied by the gasworks, and today close by the compound of BOC Gases. In the photograph, we can see what appears to be wooden construction to support the riverbank, possibly on the site of Lock-up Creek. It is believed that this inhospitable building was made of green timber, and that the immigrants could barely wait to find decent jobs, and houses for themselves. Later, for a short time, the Barracks served as the second hospital for the town, the original cottage in Maxwell Road having become far too small. After the Barracks Hospital closed down, the present Hospital, in Hospital Road, was established. 1997.152.0002
Paper -Photographs of Marlborough 1859-1909 -Copyright Marlborough Museum - Marlborough Historical Society Inc

When using this image please quote "Image courtesy of Marlborough Museum - Marlborough Historical Society Inc"

When ordering images from the Museum, please quote the Object ID for each image required.
Last modified on: December 19, 2014